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20130120
20130120
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
) >> part of district 10, supervisor cohen's district. (applause) ♪ >> certainly i'm weeding in front of my house, wait for people to show up with check. [laughter] >> get ready for that, deposit with my phone there. next is an award that i think, you know, ironically it's become one of those buzz awards for nen awards. i'll be walking down the street and have someone come up and get in my face, we're going to come back neighborhood of the year, you watch. come back neighbor of the year, it's that bcs of the nen awards. and it's my honor to introduce someone who to drone deuce this award, many of you much in the southern part of the city especially have worked side by side with and do amazing things in your neighborhood, especially along merchant corridors. that's chrisy atano of the economic work force development. (applause) >> we're at the homestretch for awards. so, i've had the distinct pleasure of being able to work with many of the residents of the portola and got corrected many times how to pronounce that name. so, i am also a resident of silver terrace. it's been such a pleasure to
-- supervisor cohen. >> hi, good afternoon, pam. i have a quick question about the proposal for increasing the time period for the permit, extensions from 365 days to 2 -- excuse me to 720 days. i just wanted to know the reasons for this. >> pamela levin. every month we have a meeting with the code -- citizen advisory committee of the building inspection department and one of the things that routinely came up is that people would have to come back and extend their permit even though they had, you know, it was stuck in one of the departments for a review and so in order to try to make it more advantageous for people to have permits to go through the process, to not keep coming back and having to pay again and again, we decided that we would extend it. >> okay. and another quick question about a timeline. the timeline when the ipic will be completing their infrastructure project, do you know what the timeline is, the proposed timeline? >> yes, what happens is that you have, depending upon your valuation of your permit, you have, like, for smaller permits you have a year and then you can e
for the eastern neighborhood citizens advisory committee. i would like to thank supervisor cohen for her confidence in me and appreciate the chance to be with you to highlight a few of my qualifications. i have been a resident of homeowner in district 10 for seven years, a resident of the bay area for 12 years; like many transplant i have fallen in love with our city and have become an active member of our community by becoming engage in political matters in volunteering my time to support good causes. i worked in the clinton white house for three years working presidential personnel and making recommendations on, yes, political appointment in his administration. i have a decent understanding of the political process and the appointment process to be sure. my career in the bay area has been and is the development primarily in large companies now with ernst & young. i also started a food truck with friends. and i chose local vendors to support our local economy. as a district 10 to this and i committed my time to community involvement as well as an advisory committee member with the mis
crew remains in charge for the next two years. larry cohen, welcome. >> great being with you. >> if the democrats were back in the minority, would you be making this fight to reform the filibuster that you're making now? >> absolutely. because we believe that what a democracy means is that the american people are entitled to get discussion, debate and eventually a vote on the critical questions of the day. we haven't had that in decades in the u.s. senate. everything dies there. it doesn't get discussed and debated there as people used to believe. we need to bring back the debate in the u.s. senate. >> but if the republicans became the majority again, they might deny you the very thing you want. >> that means democrats who are in the minority would have to stand up, talk and fight back. >> talk. talk. >> really radical ideas. talk, talk, talk, yes. >> that's eliminated right now in the senate. >> there is no discussion of these issues unless you have 60 votes of the proposition. >> because it takes 60 members of the senate to vote to continue the discussion. >> it takes 60 ju
the minutes? >> so moved. second by supervisor cohen. next item. >> item 3 citizens advisory committee report. an information item. >> good morning. >> good morning. >> i have a report. i have a quick report from the december 5 meeting of the cac. at this time we have reviewed and passed action items 5 through 9 from the december 4 plans and programs agenda. the first cac meeting of 2013 will be on wednesday, jan. 23rd. at this meeting we will vote for the chair and vice chair. for the up coming year. thank you. >> thank you very much for your presentation. if there are no comments or questions we can go on the public comment. public comment is now open. no one comes forward. we will close public comment. our next item. >> number four recommend allocation -- prop k funds, to the seven san francisco transportation committee (reading from agenda) an action item. >> i wanted to take the opportunity to welcome our new commissioner breed to the authority board and congratulations and we look forward to working with you. i will also introduce ben supka and courtney aguirre our staff to give
interviewing african-americans who grew up in what theologian james cohen callsed chate the shadow of the lynching tree. they lived in fear of one. or in the case of 92-year-old willie matthew thomas, narrowly escaped being lynched. >> so one of them said, look, we going to hang him or not? and they said, sure we're going to hang him. so he made up the noose, and they put it round my neck. and i -- i remembered in the bible it speak about how they treated jesus, and they said, "they led him away to be crucified." they led me away to be crucified, to be hung. >> thomas was saved when a white man, who knew his family, showed up with a shotgun and intervened. dr. sims got the idea for her project when she heard a speech about lynching by retired minister the reverend wallace hartsfield, sr. now 83, he was only eight or nine living in georgia when he peered from behind a curtain and saw a mob. >> they had taken the man out, and they had used his body for gun practice, and then they had hanged him, and then cut him down and dragged him through the street and this was supposed to be a wa
't cancel that project. can you work with us? michael cohen phoned me up the next day. can we cut $40 million out of this project? it was one person more responsible than any others, it's tony irons, was the architect that was responsible for the revitalization of city hall who came to my office and said, we cannot abandon this. we can't walk away from this project. we have an opportunity to really take a lot of our values and principles, particularly raising the bar as we did as a city on our green building standards, mandating the most aggressive green building standards for private construction anywhere in the united states. and showcasing them in this new building. >> the city for the sfpuc, it was critical that the building stay as a lead building. the easiest thing to do to cut out millions of dollars, let's just go from lead platinum to lead gold. but that wasn't the objective. this needed to be the best example of energy conservation of any office building in the united states. >> we became involved in the san francisco public utilities headquarter project during the time when
tv after words with guest host authors and play right janet langhart cohen. this week is dorian clayborne carson and "martin's dream" my journey and the legacy of martin luther king, jr.. in it he recalls his journey from teenage civil rights activist to his presence at the 1963 march on -- he includes encounters with the many leaders and organizers in the civil rights movement including stokely carmichael and the king family. it's about an hour. >> host: dr. carson thanks for joining me on after words. >> guest: it's my pleasure. >> host: your book, "martin's dream" is a memoir and a history book. in the book you talk about your personal journey and you are very candid about your life and you also cover new insights as a historian to the life and legacy of dr. martin luther king jr.. what prompted you to write the book this way? >> guest: well, i wanted to write about the martin luther king anniversary and 50 years of my life that came to light and his legacy and life coincides with my coming-of-age. so part of it was to move those two tasks. i felt my life have been connected to the kin
malia cohen who would like to share her opening thoughts on this award. (applause) >> can i just tell you how good it feels to be up here, to look out to see all the people that make everything possible, that really makes san francisco wonderful? and i just have got to give a special shout out. you knew i grew up in the portola for those that don't know. [cheering and applauding] >> right there at the intersection of silly man and colby, my parents still live there. that's where it started for me. but tonight is a night that we have abopportunity * to up lift and support and say thank you to all the people that certainly provide me support and provide me the motivation to get up and come to work every single day. this is an opportunity to thank and praise the people that call me stop, that e-mail me, find me on facebook, send me a twitter and pick, found me on next door. i tell you, this is your day. put your hands together. hang in there, we're almost done. but this is the day that we get to celebrate -- (applause) >> i'm calling it the nen-ers. you know what's interesting? i've be
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)